Jakkals – Feb ’19 _Episode 2_

– InfoSec stories scavenged for you from across the internet –


Three new stories this week:

  1. Two Nigerians Visit Kuala Lumpur (and Hack 20 US Universities)
  2. Phishing for iPhones (Breaking into iCloud-Locked phones)
  3. A Bad Week At Eskom (Malware, data leakage and a breakup)


1_ Two Nigerians Visit Kuala Lumpur

Back in 2014, two Nigerian chaps (sorry folks, you’re not helping the stigma) were living with expired Visas in Kuala Lumpur.

Instead of using their new found freedom to enjoy the sights of say, the Petronas Twin Towers, they launched phishing campaigns. These campaigns were targeted at employees at 140 educational institutes across the United States. Once usernames and passwords were obtained via their phishing emails, Olayinka and Damilola acquainted themselves with the financial systems of said institutes.

Their end game was to change the banking details of employees in order to reroute salary payments to accounts they (or their more unscrupulous friends) controlled. These phishing attacks were successful at 20 schools; however, when Georgia Tech personnel didn’t get their Thanksgiving paychecks, they caught wind of what was going on and called the Feds.

After some proper investigation and cooperation with the Malaysian authorities, Olayinka and Damilola was given silver arm bracelets and extradited to the US to face trial. Olayinka got six years behind bars, with Damilola receiving three.

In addition to their prison sentences, the judge also ordered them to pay restitution of $56,175.44 each (about ₦20,358,214). Back in Lagos, this can buy them around 76,000 heads of lettuce, each.

Read the FBI reports here:
https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/cyber-thieves-sentenced-for-hacking-scheme-targeting-universities-020419
https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndga/pr/jury-convicts-cybercriminal-hacking-universities
https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndga/pr/jury-convicts-cybercriminal-hacking-universities


2_ Phishing for iPhones

Joseph Cox and Jason Koebler over at Motherboard wrote a detailed piece titled: “How Hackers and Scammers Break into iCloud-Locked iPhones“. In this piece they delved into the world of thugs stealing iPhones and what goes into getting them unlocked.

If you are planning to not read their article, at least know this:

If your iPhone / iPad is stolen, the thug typically can’t do anything with it unless they have your unlock code or iCloud password. (Read the full piece to see why I say ‘typically’). This means they can’t factory reset it to sell it on.

However, there is a fairly good chance that the thieve might target you with phishing or other social engineering attacks. Reason: To get you to give up your device lock code or your iCloud account details.

And if you’re thinking: ‘Ah, first world problems, won’t affect us down South’ Think again… same attacks have been running here for the last few years already.

Read the full piece over at Motherboard:
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/8xyq8v/how-to-unlock-icloud-stolen-iphone


3_ A Bad Week At Eskom

Eskom, our local (South African) electricity provider is having an interesting week.

First, a guy on Twitter claimed to have found an online database of Eskom that’s exposing customer details. Following attempts to responsibly disclose this, he voiced his concerns in a tweet. However, Eskom has come back stating that the database he identified is not theirs, but they are investigating if the data is…

Second, another guy on Twitter claimed to have identified an Eskom computer which was infected by a RAT. It does not seem like this is a critical system (i.e. SCADA stuff) but rather a computer of a Tannie that shops for Bernina sewing supplies at Makro (based on her desktop icons). But, nether the less, still not where you want to be.

Finally, our President just announced that Eskom is being split into three separate entities (generation, transmission and distribution). This is in an attempt to prevent the corruption ridding entity from dragging the entire country’s economy down the pooper. Not that it has anything to do with points one and two, but now you know.

And lastly… I’ll leave you with some wise electricity related words:

If you can’t fix it with a hammer, it’s an electrical fault.


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